Freesteel Blog » Factories and surfaces

Factories and surfaces

Thursday, March 13th, 2014 at 7:41 pm Written by:

The days and weeks are passing me by. I’ve got to stop doing this programming and get with something I’m interested in. I don’t think I’ve been outside of Liverpool since January.

Due to a surface triangulation crisis (the speed of machining operations being four times faster than the initial time it takes the CAD kernel to produce the triangles it needs to start work), I spent the last 10 days hacking up a trimmed NURBS surface triangulator and triangle flipper with Martin based on some of the machining algorithms. We pretend the trimming curves are machining boundaries and encode an XYZ point at each XY 3-axis sample point instead of just tool tip height.

relayfacets

The triangle flipping is a second component experiment I’d been meaning to try for a long time. Can you redistribute the triangles in a better way than simply along the UV parametric lines? Not sure I’ve got an answer yet, but it’s exhausting trying to find out. I’ll write it up later when I have the energy.

Meanwhile, in another part of the city, things are being built by real engineers. I’m looking forward to installing it in the office and making it work. Which is more than can be said about many of the programming projects I’ve put my hand to recently.

I’m also wasting time posting ideas onto the internal Autodesk idea database. Most are sinking like lead bricks into mud. It’s pearls before swine. The latest idea which everyone hates is to hold Simultaneous Satellite Tech Conferences in each region rather than wasting a shedload of carbon by flying all the techies to meet in a hotel in Canada for two days.

“Oh, but I find the in-person meetings are so important for building relationships,” they say. “This never happens with on-line meetings.”

No one seems to think that maybe it’s because on-line meetings generally last less than an hour, but when you travel half-way round the world to a meeting, the duration of the meeting is in practice like 20 to 40 hours long (with sleeping breaks).

Perhaps this extended time period is what’s important, eh?

I mean, look, if you teleported into your favourite tech conference for, let’s say, one hour and fifteen minutes before suddenly vanishing in a puff of smoke, you wouldn’t be able to build a lot of relationship experiences with the people there, would you? However, if you were trapped in an elevator for 10 hours, and all you had was your phone which you could use to call the person in stuck in the other shaft, you’d become friends for life with that individual.

It’s all in the mind. Use your imagination. A functioning virtual telepresence system should not involve booking the suite for an hour on a stupid meeting. Instead it should require being time-locked in a tank for 12 or 24 hours where the only communication line is routed via the office to which your business travel destination has been designated. You can phone home, but the phone call will literally need to be be directed into a physical acoustic coupler device in that office. You are there, with all the inconvenience of being stuck there, meaning that the place of least effort to communicate is there, and it will be rude and boring if the people in that office don’t pay attention and entertain you while you are stuck there. Maybe after the first six hours you will have dispensed with enough pleasantries and finally be talking about the things you need to be talking about, and building those bonds of friendship that take time to form. Glue and cement and gelatin all take time to set. Do you not think they same could be true for our frivolous minds?

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