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More triangulation carpeting

Wednesday, March 26th, 2014 at 12:29 pm Written by:

Trying to get this surface triangulation distraction closed down today. The proposition was to see whether I could repurpose my toolpath strategy code and apply it to the problem of triangulating trimmed NURBS surfaces. After all, trimmed NURBS surfaces exist on a 2D parametric domain (like the 3-axis drive plane), and the trimming curve is very much like a machining boundary. You have to know that something like the constant scallop routine is actually modelling a surface that is repeatedly being eroded away, because the toolpaths you see are in fact the boundary outline of that surface.

One of the common triangulation results I kept getting looks like a nice Afghan carpet pattern, like this:

triangulationcarpet

I have an explanation. This happens when maxHdiffFibre is too small.

The surface is divided up into cells, and the sides of each cell has at least length/maxHdiffFibre extra points inserted along them. The convex polygonal area of each cell is then triangulated by lopping off the sharpest corners repeatedly, until you have an 8-sided shape that still has points along the top and bottom sides because they were the longest to begin with, so these are joined up. The outer boundary is the trimming curve, so one side of over-sampled cell is trimmed away leaving three sides that have too many points which need to be joined up in the best way they can. Then, at the corners of the trimming curve, the cells are subdivided to get smaller and smaller complete rectangular cells which are small enough not to be over-sampled.

I don’t think anyone else in the world misuses a 3-axis toolpath algorithm to make a triangulated surface, so this type of buggy behavior is unique.

Meanwhile, a correspondent of the blog took up the challenge of making an excellent triangulation of a cone. He did this by starting with the triangular lattice with rotational symmetry of order 6, and then cutting a pie slice out of it in order to join it together to form a cone. Because he didn’t have the power of Twistcodewiki to draw 3D geometry direct from Python in your browser, he implemented the picture of all the edges by exporting Postscript commands, and didn’t have the capability of drawing the triangles themselves in order to see the folds:

triconesurf

Twistcodewiki is great. I use it all the time, even though its light/shading features are crude and terrible, and the interface is almost non-existent. But the one thing it does is so important and unique that I can ignore the fact that it doesn’t do it very well. The same probably goes for a lot of software out there.

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